THE 2017 
CANADIAN ARTISTS
IN RESIDENCE PRIZE

The Glenfiddich Artists in Residence program offers Canadian artists a $20,000 residency prize, a chance to collaborate with other celebrated international artists, and the opportunity to live and work at The Glenfiddich Distillery in Scotland. We annually host a small group of visual artists from around the globe, who work in a diverse array of media from print and photography to animation, performance and installation. The historic setting, deep in Scotland’s highlands has inspired Canadian artists in the creation of original art work for over a decade.

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About
the program

Since its inception, the Artists in Residence program has seen over 100 artists from 18 countries take part in the summer residency at the Glenfiddich Distillery in Dufftown, Scotland. The art created takes inspiration from the distillery, history, heritage, people, and craftsmanship of the surrounding area. Each year a diverse and exciting group of the world’s artists create new, inspirational pieces of art, which are exhibited in the Glenfiddich gallery as a culmination of their time at the distillery. The residency has become widely acclaimed in the art world for providing artists with an original setting, space and community in which to work

“Through its commitment and support of the arts, the Glenfiddich Artist-in-Residence Prize gives artists not only the monetary value of their residency but provides such a fertile platform in the lovely Scottish Highlands”
Dr. Sara Diamond President OCAD University

“The Glenfiddich Artists in Residence program has established a reputation for producing radical contemporary art in the normally traditional surroundings of the Scotch whisky industry.”
The Fleming Collection

Past Recipients

  • Lee Henderson, 2017

    Lee Henderson’s is a making practice marked by the persistence of collective histories and the brevity of individual lives… which is to say it's funny, in the same way King Lear is funny.

    Lee is interested in understanding problems, with an awareness that the work of the artist lies in revealing false problems rather than solving real ones. But whether investigating problems of definition or perception, or of measurement or identification, existential crises or mundane anxieties, he has so far found that they all collapse back to the central problem of the terminus, that presumed point of ambiguous inevitability we spend our conscious lives avoiding, or from which we supposedly sprang. This doesn't have to mean the beginning/end of a particular human life—it can as easily be the disappearance of a culture, the retrofitting of an edifice, the emergence of a language, or the transition between weather patterns. And like an electron or a fable, when examined with care, the terminus problem-point reveals itself to be permeable, mutable, and indiscernible.

    Throughout this process Lee stumbles, he gropes; and latches on to a piece of material, or an historical factoid, or the cultural baggage of an object, or a quirk of language, and become fascinated-obsessed until it reveals the mortal banality of its associations. Those associations—networks of human intellectual-emotional investment, more commonly known as "meaning"—then find expression in reconfigurations of light, text, space, sound, and matter. Making artwork is every bit as absurd, direct, and fruitful as rearranging furniture just to see the pattern on the floor.

     

  • Eleanor King, 2016

    Eleanor King is an interdisciplinary artist based in New York and Nova Scotia. She participated in residencies at The MacDowell Colony, Yaddo, SOMA Mexico, and The Banff Centre among others. She has received creation grants from the Canada Council for the Arts and Arts Nova Scotia, and was a national finalist for the 2012 Sobey Art Award. King has exhibited nationally and internationally, including the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art, Nuit Blanche Toronto, the Southern Alberta Art Gallery, Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art (NY) and Galleri F15 (Norway). Her solo exhibition Dark Utopian was recently on view at the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, and her work was the subject of a feature-length cover article in the Fall 2014 issue of Canadian Art magazine. Eleanor is currently a Fulbright fellow and MFA candidate at Purchase College, State University of New York (graduation May 2016), and she received a BFA from NSCAD University. She is represented by Diaz Contemporary in Toronto. “Combining music, sound art, social practices, improvisation and other modes of creation, the art of Eleanor King is difficult to classify, but remains reliably enjoyable. Whether stacking reams of vinyl records skyward in a sculpture, creating a working bar as part of an art installation, tracing old tape reels to make a drawing, amplifying the sounds of underground streams for a public artwork, (or) playing in Halifax-area bands... her art often provide(s) new ways of connecting with the present moment.” Canadian Art, November 2012

  • Jon Sasaki, 2015

    Jon Sasaki is a Toronto-based multidisciplinary artist, whose practice frequently borrows Conceptual Art strategies, redeploying them in work with an emotionally resonant core. While his projects often employ both humour and pathos, they do so in the service of addressing the fraught and fragile nature of human interactions. Sasaki's work can at times be mildly and intentionally antagonistic towards audiences and participants; he aims to test the limits of sociability, audience generosity, sustainability of actions, conviviality, hope, enthusiasm. Projects invariably risk and even court failure. For Sasaki, tragedy is an inevitable by-product of a practice that is aspirational at its core.

    Sasaki's work has been exhibited in numerous solo exhibitions, recently at the Ottawa Art Gallery, (Ottawa, ON); the Tom Thomson Art Gallery (Owen Sound, ON); Dunlop Art Gallery (Regina, SK); MacLaren Art Centre (Barrie, ON); the Southern Alberta Art Gallery, (Lethbridge, AB); and the Art Gallery of Ontario. Recent group exhibitions include Platform Art Spaces (Melbourne, Australia); Nihonbashi Institute of Contemporary Art, (Tokyo, Japan); Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art (Toronto, ON); The Justina M. Barnicke Gallery, (Toronto, ON); Pace University Digital Gallery, (New York, NY); and Dazibao (Montréal, QC); and Oakville Galleries. Sasaki holds a BFA from Mount Allison University (Sackville, NB) and is represented by Clint Roenisch Gallery in Toronto.

    Sasaki holds a BFA from Mount Allison University.

  • Rhonda Weppler and Trevor Mahovsky, 2014

    Weppler and Mahovsky have worked collaboratively since 2004. Both artists have MFA degrees from the University of British Columbia, where they met in 1996. They initially developed their collaborative practice in Vancouver and have continued after relocating in 2012; Mahovsky currently lives in Toronto, while Weppler divides her time between Vancouver, Burlington and San Francisco.

    Exhibits include: National Gallery of Canada (Ottawa), Vancouver Art Gallery, Alter Space, (San Francisco), Art Gallery of Alberta (Edmonton), Flux Projects (Atlanta), Contemporary Art Gallery (Vancouver), LABoral (Gijon), Dos de Mayo (Madrid), Power Plant (Toronto), Musee d’art Contemporain (Montreal),   Nuit Blanche (Toronto), Orange Coast College Photography Gallery (Costa Mesa, CA), Tokyo Wonder Site, loop-raum (Berlin), Art Gallery of Nova Scotia (Halifax), 516Arts (Albuquerque).   

  • Daniel Barrow, 2013

    Winner of the 2010 Sobey Art Award, Winnipeg-born, Montreal-based Barrow has exhibited widely in Canada and abroad including performances at; The Walker Art Center (Minneapolis), The Museum of Contemporary Art (Los Angeles), and The Portland Institute for Contemporary Art’s TBA festival.

    “Thanks so much to everyone at Glenfiddich for this wonderful artist residency opportunity. I had an incredibly, intensive and productive summer – creating 2 new performances, as well as a print and drawing series. I know that the work and the concepts I conceived in Scotland, will act as the footing and foundation for the exhibitions I will present over, at least, the next few years”.

  • Jillian McDonald, 2012

    During her time at the distillery, Jillian cast local residents and Glenfiddich craftspeople in a video, creating costumes and masks on location in response to the local landscape, legends, traditional highlands costume, and folklore - both real and imagined. The haunting remarkable romanticism of the landscape figures prominently as the camera creeps across the valleys uncovering dales and knolls.

  • Helen Cho, 2011

    "The goal of the workshop is not about producing good art/craftwork but to enjoy the idea of, and the experience of making something"

    Born 1969, Youngwall, South Korea, Helen Cho moved to Canada in 1982. She now lives and works in Berlin, Germany. Her artworks explore disparate elements encountered in daily life such as everyday objects, prosaic thoughts and film images that are bound together in fateful collisions on an unexpected surface unbound by time, place or space. Notions of make-believe and facts intertwine, chronologies of history are upset, and objects of fiction co-exist in the same space as real objects.

  • Damian Moppett, 2010

    Born 1969 Calgary Alberta, Damian is a graduate of the Emily Carr College of Art and Design, Vancouver, British Columbia, where he went on to teach between 1998 and 2004. Currently living and working in Vancouver, his work is analytical, conceptual, and highly referential in both form and content. Exploring the process of craft making and it's ability to function as a highly personal and autobiographical art form. Moppett also focuses on his own skills; he produces work that spans the entire range of media including painting, drawing, sculpture, photography, film and ceramics.

    Solo-exhibitions include Yvon Lambert, Paris, (2009); Temple University Gallery, Philadelphia (2009); Catriona Jeffries Gallery, Vancouver (2007); and Carleton University Art Gallery, Ottawa, (2006).

  • Arabella Campbell, 2009

    Arabella Campbell lives and works in Vancouver. She has a Bachelor of Arts from the University of British Columbia (1996) and a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Emily Carr Institute of Art and the San Francisco Art Institute (2002).

    Arabella Campbell’s practice is rooted in the studio and attends to a range of media. Calling attention to the white cube, the context of the art exhibition and the medium itself, Campbell’s practice is consistently self-reflexive and produced with formal clarity. Her practice is informed by site-specific studies and conceptual based strategies, resulting in formally attentive works that are concerned with the fundamental structures of representation, as they are manifest in materials, language and place. 

  • Dave Dyment, 2008

    Based in Toronto, Canada, Dave Dyment is best known for his sound installation work, although he also works in multiples and photography. Dave’s unique project was inspired by his interest in the collapsing of time and the notion of artists planning a work which will not be complete until their lifetime has passed. A 500L second fill sherry butt full of new-make Glenfiddich spirit has been entombed in the ground at the Glenfiddich Distillery. 25 empty bottles have been sold at The Toronto International Art Fair for CAN$2,000. Buyers can pass on the bottle for the liquid to be redeemed in 100 years’ time when the cask is opened (T&Cs apply).

    ‘The whisky itself will be the ultimate gift, a whisky that the buyer will never taste, but will pass on.' Dave Dyment, June 08

  • Jonathan Kaiser, 2007

    Born in 1982 in Winnipeg, Jonathan went on to study at the University of Alberta, where he achieved a BFA with Distinction in 2005. Jonathan has held a number of exhibitions across Canada, including the recent Alberta Biennial of Contemporary Art 2007. The landscape around the distillery and the heritage of Glenfiddich has been a major influence during his residency along with the mysticism – both established and newly imagined.

    "During my stay at the Glenfiddich Distillery I have been impressed by its picturesque Highland setting and the proud family history it was built on. I also appreciate the romantic images associated with the brand like the iconic Glenfiddich stag and, being a bit of a Christmas fanatic, the fact that the first drop of spirit ran from the stills on Christmas Day 1887." Jonathan Kaiser 2/7/07

Andy Fairgrieve

As curator for the Glenfiddich Artists in Residence program, Andy Fairgrieve is the colourful, dreadlocked go-to-guy-in-a-kilt. Andy holds the all-inclusive role of coordinator/curator; from artist selection to travel visas, Andy insures that visiting artists get the very best experience while in residence, “In short I act as a local guide, curator and gallery technician. For me whisky is all about relationships, bringing people together and sharing with friends. With that in mind it’s a positive reinforcement of ‘guid’ Highland hospitality that each year, over the weeks and months that the artists are here, lasting associations are formed.”

Andy has been handling every detail of the Artists in Residence prize since its inception in 2002. As curator, he understands the creative thought process and is able to visualise not only the artists’ proposed pieces but the path needed to turn it onto a reality. Andy’s knowledge of the distillery is essential, particularly, when it comes to knowing who to speak to in order to help make the artists’ ideas come to life. One of the things Andy loves most about the Glenfiddich Artists in Residence program is the mission to encourage people to delight in life’s adventures. Andy shares that over a decade after its inception, the program remains, “vibrant and has earned a world-wide reputation for its un-prescriptive and supportive approach. What never ceases to amaze me is that despite having had over 100 artists through our doors since we began, each one of them always sees the distillery with fresh eyes. I feel as long as we can carry on in this vein the program will continue to delight and surprise for years to come!"

2016 Jury

  • Dr. Sara Diamond

    Dr. Sara Diamond is the President and Vice-Chancellor of OCAD University, Canada’s “university of the imagination”. She holds a PhD in Computing, Information Technology and Engineering from the University of East London, a Masters in Digital Media theory from the University of Arts London and Honours Bachelors of Arts in History and Communications from Simon Fraser University.

    She is an appointee of the Order of Ontario and Royal Canadian Society of Artists and a recipient of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal. Diamond has guided OCAD University in becoming a leader in digital media, design research and curriculum through the Digital Futures Initiative, new research in Inclusive Design, health and design, as well as in sustainable technologies and design. She also has played a leading role in OCAD University's establishment of the unique Aboriginal Visual Culture Program. 

  • Dave Dyment

    Dave Dyment was the 2008 Canadian Artists in Residence Prize recipient and has served on the selection jury panel for Artists in Residence Canada for the past 5 years.

    Based in Toronto, Dave is best known for his sound installation work, although he also works in multiples and photography. Dave has had a number of solo exhibitions, and his work has been displayed all over the world from Bulgaria to Ireland, London, Canada and the USA. 

  • Kristy Trinier

    Kristy Trinier is a Curator at the Art Gallery of Alberta. Trinier curated Future Station: 2015 Alberta Biennial of Contemporary Art, as well as exhibitions at the AGA and Enterprise Square Galleries. Her previous roles include Public Art Director at the Edmonton Arts Council, where she managed the City of Edmonton’s Public Art Collection and public art programs, and Grant Writer at The Banff Centre. Trinier holds a Bachelors degree in Visual Art and English from the University of Victoria, and a Masters degree in Public Art from the Dutch Art Institute as a Huygens scholar in The Netherlands. She is currently pursuing PhD studies in Philosophy, Art and Critical Thought at European Graduate School based in Switzerland, and volunteers on the Board for Nuit Blanche Edmonton and as the secretary for Ociciwan Contemporary Art Collective.

  • Stefan Hancherow

    Stefan Hancherow is a curator and collector based in Toronto. He has recently held positions as the Project Director of Feature Contemporary Art Fair and Assistant Curator of the Sobey Art Award. He is an alumnus of NSCAD University, and graduated with an MFA from OCAD University in 2013. Recent curatorial projects include Absolutely Free at OCAD U, There is No There at the Hamilton Artists Inc. and Is This Thing On? at MSVU Art Gallery.

  • Michelle Jacques

    Michelle Jacques is currently the Chief Curator at the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria (AGGV), where she is responsible for guiding a curatorial and education program that links contemporary practices, ideas and issues to the Gallery's historical collections and legacies. Since joining the AGGV, she has curated exhibitions with contemporary artists Carol Sawyer, Rodney Sayers and Emily Luce, Gwen MacGregor, and Hiraki Sawa; co-curated major retrospectives of the work of the Canadian artists Anna Banana and Jock Macdonald; and developed a series of installations that use the Gallery's collection to evoke cross-cultural conversations. Prior to moving west, she held various roles in the Contemporary and Canadian departments of the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; was the Director of Programming at the Centre for Art Tapes in Halifax; and taught courses in writing, art history at curatorial studies at NSCAD University, University of Toronto Mississauga, and OCAD University.

  • Ivan Jurakic

    Ivan Jurakic is the Director/Curator of the University of Waterloo Art Gallery. He received his MFA from SUNY Buffalo and an Honours BA from the University of Guelph. Since 2004, he has curated numerous exhibitions, sat on the curatorial panel for the 2009 Sobey Art Award and co-curated Zone C for Scotiabank Nuit Blanche 2013. His curatorial practice focuses on multidisciplinary art and installation and he has curated significant exhibitions and written about the work of Kelly Mark, Colleen Wolstenholme, James Carl, Laurel Woodcock, Kelly Richardson, Lois Andison, Roula Partheniou and many others. He is also a principal of TH&B, an artist collective whose site- responsive projects address the intersection of urban and rural environments. He lives in Hamilton.

How to Apply 

Submissions are open for the 2017 Artists in Residence Prize as of December 7, 2016 and must be received by midnight eastern standard time, January 31, 2017. Applicants will be shortlisted for jury consideration based on their completion of application. Candidates for The Artists in Residence Prize are requested to submit a proposal outlining how they would like to use their residency. For complete terms of reference, selection criteria and application process please download the PDF below.

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